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The History of our Public Schools
Wyandotte County, Kansas

1844
2012

 

 

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The Story of Kansas City, Kansas

"Citizenship"

You remember that the Shawnees, the Delawares, and the Wyandots were not natives here.  They had moved from their homes in the East so that white people could have their land.  Such Indians were known as Emigrant Tribes.

[Annotation:  Information in following table provided at http://www.wyandot.org/tribes.htm and links following table are additional Internet sites for research.]

Tribe
Year in Kansas
State of Departure
Shawnee
1825
Missouri, Ohio, Indiana
Miami
1827
Ohio, Indiana, Illinois
Delaware
1828
Ohio, Indiana
Peoria, Kaskaskia, Wea, Pinankeshaw
1832
Illinois
Kickapoo
1832
Missouri, Illinois, Indiana
Ottawa
1833
Illinois, Wisconsin
Cherokee
1835
Georgia
Iowa
1836
Iowa
Chippewa
1836
Michigan
Pottawatomie
1836
Indiana
Sac and Fax
1837
Iowa and Wisconsin
Wyandot
1843
Ohio and Michigan

Kansas Native American Genealogy

Kansas Plains and Emigrant Tribes

TALES OUT OF SCHOOL
from the Center for Great Plains Studies/Emporia State University

You may remember, too, that the government had promised that the new country would belong to the Indians as long as the grass grew and the water ran.  It promised also that they would never be a part of any territory or state.

The grass was still growing and the water running when the white people complained, "It isn't fair that 34,000 Indians should own so much space and ride over miles and miles of it just to hunt buffalo."

The Wyandot leaders wished to sell their land to the whites.  They wanted to become citizens of the United States and to have charge of their own affairs.  From early times the members of the tribe had owned everything in common.  The white people would get what they wanted anyway, they thought.  The Indians did not want another removal, so they set about organizing a territory.

A Provisional Government

Return to Index for "The Story of Kansas City, Kansas" by Nellie McGuinn

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Contact the History Webmaster - Patricia Adams

History Site created on December 02, 2002
Page last updated: 02-Jan-2012

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