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The History of our Public Schools
Wyandotte County, Kansas

1844
2012

 

 

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Kansas Education Progress 1858-1967, Adel F. Throckmorton, June 1967
Prepared for W. C. Kamphchroeder, State Superintendent of Instruction
Published by the State Department of Public Instruction, Topeka, Kansas, June 1967
p. 110

Year
Action Taken
1858
County Superintendents authorized to certify teachers
1863
State Normal Schools authorized to certify teachers who meet requirements set by the institution
1873
State Board of Education created and authorized to certify teachers upon examination
1876
Boards of Educations of cities of the first and second class authorized to certify teachers
1893
State Board of Education authorized to substitute credit from approved colleges for examination in those subjects as qualification for certification of teachers
1899
Graduates of the University of Kansas and other accredited institutions taking required courses could qualify to be certified by the State Board of Education
1909
State Board of Education authorized to issue certificates to high school graduates completing high school normal training courses and passing a state examination
1915
Legislature set Bachelor degree requirement for high school teachers
1937
The State Board of Education and the three State Teachers Colleges given exclusive authority to certify teachers
1947
The State Superintendent of Public Instruction given exclusive authority to certify teachers under rules and regulations approved by the State Board of Education and to graduates of Teachers Colleges with institutional recommendation

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"HOMELAND SCHOOLS", Cabins to Complexes
Compiled by Republic County Retired Teachers Association
Copyright 1976
(Copy available at the Republic County Historical Society and Museum; Belleville, KS)

p. 26 - In 1858 the Territorial Legislature created the office of county superintendent and gave that official the authority to certify teachers.  One year later he was given power to organize school districts.  The Wyandotte Constitution under which Kansas became a state continued these powers.  The county superintendent was authorized to continue organizing school districts "By dividing the county into a convenient number of units."

The first state Board of Education was organized under legislative authority in 1873.  The duties of the board were limited by law to issuing state diplomas and certificates to teachers.  Both were issued upon examination.  The diplomas were valid in any school district of the state for life.  Two levels of certificates were valid for only three and five years, respectively.

1876:  Boards of Education (BOE) of cities of the first and second class authorized to certify teachers.

1893:  State BOE authorized to substitute credit from approved colleges for examination in those subjects as qualification for certification of teachers.

1899:  Graduates of the University of Kansas and other accredited institutions taking required courses could qualify to be certified by the State BOE.

1909:  State BOE authorized to issue certificates to high school graduates completing high school normal training courses and passing a state exam.

1915:  Legislature set Bachelor degree requirement for high school teachers.

1937:  State BOE and the three state teachers college given exclusive authority to certify teachers.

1947:  State Superintendent given exclusive authority to certify teachers under rules and regulations approved by the State BOE and to graduates of teachers colleges with institutional recommendations.

It was not until 1959 that there were ironclad degree requirement put into effect for elementary teachers.  This was a long time coming, partly because of the teacher shortages occasioned by World War II and then by the large numbers of school-age children in the post war years.  Even so, the rights of teachers already teaching in 1959 were protected by a "grandfather" clause.  The Kansas State Teachers Association had a great deal to do with putting the pressure on for higher professional standards.

We have come a long, long way and would put our teachers with their fine training and professionalism beside any in the nation today!  However, we salute those schools of the past for the courage and determination to "make the good better, and the better the best!

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Contact the History Webmaster - Patricia Adams

History Site created on December 02, 2002
Page last updated: 02-Jan-2012

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